Support - things to read

Short PDF documents about SCOUT, CODE, SCORE and GenetiCode

Larger PDF document about our main software products.

Manuals as PDF documents:

Manuals as EPUB documents (electronic books for the iPad or other iOS devices):

Manuals as MOBI documents (electronic books for e-book readers like Kindle):

Manuals as web pages:

Manuals as *.chm documents (Windows help files):


Publications related to our products

Follow the story of VirCoC (Virtual Coating Company) to see how our products are used to solve thin film analysis and design problems. Note that VirCoC is not real, and you cannot buy any coating products VirCoC develops. However, you can download the VirCoC database (which is discussed in the documentation) and use the data and program configurations for your own work. The database is available as a compressed zip-file with path information, and you should extract the file reconstructing the original folder structure.


Model meets measurement - the challenges of optical spectrum simulation facing real thin film deposition

This contribution of W.Theiss to the ICCG6 in Dresden (June 2006) explains how to use spectrum simulation for production control.


Looking through walls - Coatings on glass for buildings

This contribution of W.Theiss to the COSP'04 conference in Berlin explains the basic functions of low-e and solar control coatings on glass.


Analyzing optical spectra by computer simulation - from basics to batch mode

A PDF-document about spectrum simulation, summarizing the background and typical applications of this technique.


Developing optical production control methods for SCOUT

A PDF-document about developing SCOUT methods. Good to read if you are looking for a thin film production control solution - even if you are not developing the method yourself but let us do the work.


Detailed CODE overview

Summary of an introductory talk about the CODE software


SPRAY special: Physical models for color prediction

This PDF-document explains how the SPRAY ray-tracing software can be used to predict the optical appearance of printed patterns.